Wednesday, May 21, 2008

Refa'einu - Part 2 - Hashem's Healing - Audio Shiur


This past Sunday, the Baltimore Community Kollel Tefilla Chaburah enjoyed its second shiur from Reb Yerachmiel on the topic of berchas "Refa'ainu", the 8th bracha of our cherished Shemoneh Esrei.

In preparation for Lag Ba'Omer, Reb Yerachmiel drew from the Zohar Ha'Kadosh and utilized Rav Shimshon Pincus' heartfelt and emotional writing to explain the distinction between Hashem's healing through His many sheluchim (doctors, medicine, exercising, etc.) and Hashem's healing via His "Personal" involvement. Also discussed was Rav Pincus' profound chiddush regarding "how" Hashem's "Personal" healing actually works!

Listen and you'll be treated to a beautiful combination of Torah designed to awaken an awe-inspiring "Lovesickness" and longing for "Kirvas Elokim Le Tov"; closeness to Hashem.

You can CLICK HERE to listen to the shiur. You can "left click" to listen to the shiur right away, or "right click" and select "Save Target As."

-Dixie Yid

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6 comments:

Anonymous said...

Holy brother Dixie,
Have you ever written anything on tznius and it's halachot and different hashkafot? I've been curious recently. thanks~

DixieYid said...

What specifically are you curious about? Any particular reason for the interest? What area of tznius are you thinking about? In behavior, in speech, in dress? Look forward to hearing back holy brother/sister anonymous.

-Dixie Yid

Anonymous said...

I would like to know the general halachot of dress and the line that can be drawn between what is actual halacha, chumra, and the stereotypes of how a frum bas yisroel should dress (and maybe a ben torah as well) and if they are accurate or not. whats ur email?

DixieYid said...

My e-mail's on the right sidebar, near the top.

Anonymous said...

Parshas Bechukosai
אִם-בְּחֻקֹּתַי תֵּלֵכוּ וְאֶת-מִצְו‍ֹתַי תִּשְׁמְרוּ וַעֲשִׂיתֶם אֹתָם
1) The Mincha Belulah addresses the reason for the word אִם in our posuk. He says the word אִם is an acronym for the great leaders of Klal Yisrael in Golus. It is an acronym for Aharon and Moshe, Mordechai and Esther, and when Moshiach comes speedily in our day it will be Moshiach and Eliyahu Hanavi.
2) What is the significance of תֵּלֵכוּ in our Posuk? The Tiferes Yonason answers in the Torah people are called הולכים and Malachim are called עומדים. This is because Malachim don’t work on themselves so they are standing still and not moving henceעומדים.Then there are people who are always moving growing as people from one level to the next hence הולכים .Therefore the posuk says תֵּלֵכוּ because if you keep moving spiritually then in the next posukim it says וְנָתַתִּי גִשְׁמֵיכֶם בְּעִתָּם you will reap the rewards.
וְנָתַתִּי גִשְׁמֵיכֶם בְּעִתָּם וְנָתְנָה הָאָרֶץ יְבוּלָהּ וְעֵץ הַשָּׂדֶה יִתֵּן פִּרְיו
Why does the Posuk use the word גִשְׁמֵיכֶם your rain?
Rav Moshe Feinstein answers the question based on a famous Medrash. The Medrash says that Alexander went to meet another king in Africa. During the visit a court case came in front of the king. The case was one man bought a field from the other. They found gold on the field. He claimed he only bought the field and taking the gold would be theft. The second party claimed he sold the field and everything on it and taking it now would be theft and he would have no part of it. They now stood in front of the king for judgment. He asked one do you have a son, he answered yes. He then asked the second party do you have a daughter he answered yes. The king then issued his judgment your daughter will marry your son and they will share in your joint wealth. When Alexander heard this he remarked if it was me I would judge very differently. The African king asked him how would you judge? He said I would chop both their heads off and take the money myself. The King replied do you have rain in your kingdom; Alexander replied yes. The king then asked do you have small animals he said yes. The king told him you should know the reason you receive rain is because of your small animals. Now says Reb Moshe we understand our posuk. The king established it is possible to receive rain not in our own merit but on the merit of small animals so our posuk is telling if you learn torah you will get the rain in your own merit.
What is the significance of the word בְּעִתָּם?
1) The Bnei Yissachar answers it is judged on Rosh Hashanah how much rain that person receives that year. The word בְּעִתָּם tells you if you do Aveirous then hashem could send all the rain at once and there would be no Bracha in fact it would be ruinous so the posuk says בְּעִתָּם it will be in a timely matter that the rain will be for Bracha.
2) The last Posuk in Behar ends off you should watch my Shabbos. The Posukim in Bechukosai promise וְנָתַתִּי גִשְׁמֵיכֶם בְּעִתָּם what is the connection? The answer lies in two Gemara's .The Gemara in Shabbos said whoever keeps Shabbos all his Aveirous are forgiven. The Gemara in Taanis says when the rain does not fall all a persons Aveirous are forgiven. Now we understand the correlation of our posukim. If you want the rain to fall on time like the posuk in our Parsha then keep Shabbos and you will be forgiven so you don’t need Hashem to hold back the rain in order to receive your forgiveness. You therefore see the correlation between the last Parsha and ours. ֹ
וְהִשִּׂיג לָכֶם דַּיִשׁ אֶת-בָּצִיר וּבָצִיר יַשִּׂיג אֶת-זָרַע וַאֲכַלְתֶּם לַחְמְכֶם לָשֹׂבַע
Rashi translates this Posuk to mean you will eat a little and be full. The Sefer Taam Vadaas asks why eat a little and be full why not get a lot? The answer today is tremendously clear. The high rates of obesity and Diabetes and other diseases that come with living in a rich society clear show us Rashi had the right idea. The Torah had the great foresight to say it is not a lot of food but being satisfied with a little that is the key.

Anonymous said...

I'm not sure that I understand the connection between the previous posts and this shuir (could it be that there is none?), but this shiur was beautiful, as usual.