Monday, January 7, 2008

I Want My Son to Go to THAT School!


A friend of mine told me about the affect his son's yeshiva is having on his 4 year old son, who's in kindergarten there. The other day after school, this boy got a splinter in his hand. While his wife was removing the splinter, this boy closed his eyes tight and was repeating, "Gam zu l'tova! Gam zu l'tova! Gam zu l'tova!" (This too is for the best! This too is for the best! This too is for the best!)

All I have to say is that I want my son to go to that yeshvia!

Our son, pictured above, will IY"H, be having his Upsherin in about 6 weeks and we're considering schools to send him to. Very scary and exciting decision to make!

-Dixie Yid

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10 comments:

A Simple Jew said...

WOW! That's some mane of hair he has :)

Alice said...

SO cute.

muse said...

There's a lot of siyata d'Shmaya involved in choosing the right school.
Good luck

Barzilai said...

That's a beautiful story, and is definitely drasha fodder!

DixieYid said...

Barzilai,

Feel free to use it!

-Dixie Yid

Anonymous said...

Amazing story.
So... what Yeshiva is he at?

yehudis said...

I'll top your story. A friend was at the local kupat cholim (clinic) here in Meah Shearim, and a five year old had to get a splinter out. While the nurse cleaned the wound and probed, he closed his eyes tight and said, "Ein od milvado! Ein od milvado!"
Tell me that doesn't top you...
Naturally, he learns with the "kanoim"...

DixieYid said...

yehudis,

That's a good one. But what exactly does it mean that he learning with the "kanoim?" I know what the word means but does it refer to a certain sect, Reb Areleh or something like that?

IY"H, I'm posting your husband's guest post tomorrow.

-Dixie Yid

Neil Harris said...

Great post. Just be thankful that you have choices in terms of schools. Some are not so lucky.

yehudis said...

Hi, sorry it took so long to respond.
"Kanoim" usually means, in this neighborhood at least, any of the shtarke groups who follow the line of the Eida HaChareidis. His cheder could be Reb Ahrele, could be Shomrei Emunim, or Zupnik, or any of what we always called "the Hungarian mentality." (I'm allowed to say it because I'm Hungarian.) Even parts of the Breslov community in Yerushalayim are considered, or consider themselves, naturally aligned with "the kanoim." To my mind and experience, it's a very straight, pure, Yiddishkeit, with absolutely no interest in anything outside. Which is empowering but can also limit one's ability to effectively communicate the Jewish message beyond one's borders. But, hey, that's the job of people like us, no? We all have our place.
Halevai I had the steadfastness and passion for avodah that I see among my Toldos Aharoner neighbors. There is a lot to learn.